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Western Mexico

Western Mexico 300 B.C. - 400 AD

The Western Mexico shaft tomb tradition or shaft tomb culture refers to a set of interlocked cultural traits found in the western Mexican states of Jalisco, Nayarit, and, to a lesser extent, Colima to its south, roughly dating to the period between 300 BCE and 400 CE, although there is not wide agreement on this ...

Western Mexico 300 B.C. - 400 AD

The Western Mexico shaft tomb tradition or shaft tomb culture refers to a set of interlocked cultural traits found in the western Mexican states of Jalisco, Nayarit, and, to a lesser extent, Colima to its south, roughly dating to the period between 300 BCE and 400 CE, although there is not wide agreement on this end-date.

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Western Mexico There are 6 products.

Subcategories

  • Jalisco

    Jalisco 

    The name "Jalisco" is believed to be derived from the Nahuatl words "xalli" (sand, gravel) and "ixtli," which means "face," or by extension, plane. Thus, the word Jalisco would literally mean "sandy place." The first inhabitants of Jalisco were nomadic tribes traveling through the area en route to the south.

  • Nayarit

    Nayarit 300 B.C. - 500 AD

    The Nayarit civilization developed in the State of the same name, along the Pacific Coast of Mexico, between 300 B.C. and 500 A.D. Also called the “shaft tomb culture”, it is renowned for its graves inside which numerous terracotta figurines were found. The latters, depicting daily life figures, such as warriors, pregnant women or couples, are characterized by large bodies, massive legs, expressive faces, and rich fineries such as the rows of rings that decorates their ears, broad necklaces or nasal ornaments

  • Colima

    Colima

    The ceramics of Colima represent a wider diversity of themes and shapes than those of Jalisco and Nayarit, but there is less variety in style. They generally exhibit a great naturalism. Best known are the hollow figures with a glossy slip. Their colour varies from deep red to light orange, although some of them are blackened as a result of the firing process.

  • Chinesco

    Chinesco 300 B.C. - 500 AD

    Develops in the region matching the modern-day State of the same name, along the Pacific coast of Mexico, between 300 B.C. and 500 A.D. The Chinesco pottery is more particularly associated with a specific area, in the south-west of Nayarit, around the villages of Las Cebollas and Santiago Compostella. Its name, which means “Chinese” in Spanish, was first used by dealers who after discovering those figures for the first time

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